Playing Catch-Up: events, writer’s block & #amwriting

Unfortunately, I’ve fallen behind with my blog. So huge apologies to you all! It’s not that I’ve forgotten about you or the blog, it’s just that there have been lots of events to attend, proofs to complete, new freelance contracts to sign, 2018 festival pitches and other applications to complete, and new manuscripts to write. It all takes a lot of time, and when time gets tight, I reduce my online presence to keep everything ticking over as it should.

BookofRevengecoverThe good news is: The Book of Revenge – Nine Lives Trilogy 3 is completed. The proofs are done, gone, (almost) a distant memory. The final book in the Nine Lives Trilogy did not manage to kill me (as I feared it might around February earlier this year) and I’m super excited to see it on the shelves in 2018. The Dublin launch will be February 15th – more details to follow but save the date!

And so, that means I’m now out of contract. It’s simultaneously exciting and nerve wracking – who knows what will happen in the future? But right now, I’m enjoying working on the second drafts of two new manuscripts. No deadlines or pressure, except whatever I impose upon myself. I’m keeping a steady pace – maybe not as fast as I’d like – but I’m making progress and am being kind to myself. After all, four books published in two and a half years is pretty tough going so I think slowing it down now will have a positive impact further down the line.

Around all the proofing and writing, I had a fabulous time last month travelling around Ireland’s libraries for the Children’s Book Festival, meeting lots of young readers and writers. The ideas, the questions – fabulous! Often, I was working alone, but I also did some events with Alan Early and Caroline Busher. I love doing events so much but when you do several a day with lots of travel in-between, it can get tiring. So it’s really lovely to have wonderful friends you can work alongside to keep up the momentum and have a laugh with!

Myself and Caroline debuted our Things That Go Bump in the Night interactive storytelling event at the Glor theatre for Ennis libraries and it went down a storm. We had the best sound and light technician ever (thank you, Ian); it was a lot of work and slightly terrifying, but we had a ball. Now all we need to do is figure out how to take it on the road… any takers?

glor 13

After the show was over, I suggested to Caroline that I should be banned from having any more ideas for a while – especially if they’re completely new, a lot of work and take us well out of our comfort zone. And she agreed wholeheartedly. But then, we had some chats over a glass of wine by a fire and candlelight and guess what? Inspiration hit and we had another very exciting idea – it’s not fully formed yet, but it’s going to happen, so watch this space!

Speaking of too many ideas… yesterday, I was honoured to be one of the guest speakers at the fantastic Fiction at the Friary event in Cork city, organised by the impressive duo, Madeleine D’Arcy and Danielle McLaughlin. There was a great and enthusiastic crowd, and one of the questions asked was about writer’s block. Now, I’ve never had writer’s block (yet), I suffer from the opposite: too many ideas, and many of them terrible. So my issue is sifting through the nonsense in search of gems.

But I do find that stopping writing altogether makes it harder to start back up again. Writing is a muscle that needs to be continually flexed, so if you are suffering from writer’s block, I suggest writing something new. A short story or poem or piece of flash fiction perhaps. Step away from the current WIP and try to play. Let it be terrible or without purpose. Alternatively, take a long walk and record any thoughts/ideas on your mobile phone, then go home and type them up.

If all else fails, distract yourself with something completely unrelated, then trick yourself back to the desk to write something about whatever it was you chose to do. Break the habit of focusing on not writing and find yourself writing again.

Get moving. Writing anything. Gain momentum. Then write more. 

And now, it’s time for me sign off – I have to pack because I’m off to the Irish Book Awards tomorrow. I didn’t have a book out this year so I’m not nominated, but I’m delighted to have lots of friends shortlisted – I’ll be cheering loudly for them all – and I’m really looking forward to catching up with lots of friends.

Until next time… happy reading, happy writing x 

 

The Irish Book Awards & Making Dreams Reality

BookofshadowsWriting a book was simply a dream. I’ve always loved books; they’ve been my sanctuary for as long as I can remember. They got me through a traumatic childhood and continued to stick by me through thick and thin over the years. Books helped me dream, learn, imagination, escape, relax, feel secure and so much more. I’m turning 40 next year, so that’s a lot of hard work and support they’ve had to offer.

As for writing, I can’t actually remember a time when I didn’t write. I’m not one of those people with memories of being in the pram or cot; my first recollections are from the age of about six, and of writing poems. So writing was also a constant in my early life – until growing up and work got in the way. Over time, I let careers, ambition and financial concerns soak up my time and attention. I still read, but writing became a guilty secret, hidden away from the world, and eventually it dropped away completely.

But after establishing myself successfully in several careers and still not feeling particularly happy, I looked deep into my heart and asked – when did I last feel truly alive and full of possibility? And the answer was when I lost myself in stories. And so, I finally picked up a pen and started writing again. Poems, flash fiction, stories – eventually these got published. When I let writing back in my life again, I felt more complete. Eventually, I decided to try and realise my deeply buried dream of becoming a published author.

Ireland has a huge role to play in this dream becoming a reality. I moved here from Spain for work, and fell in love with the country and its people. I found the Inkwell workshops run by Vanessa O’Loughlin, and met fellow aspiring writers. The workshops were fantastic and inspiring, but the friendships developed were invaluable. We stayed in touch, supporting each other along the rocky and uncertain path to publication. I felt respected, supported and full of possibility. Ireland became my first true home and I began to realise that maybe being an author was something I could genuinely achieve.

Some risky decisions, a move to West Cork, a pile of work, and lots of rejection later, my first book deal was signed, followed by another! The Book of Learning – Nine Lives Trilogy 1 was chosen as the Dublin UNESCO Citywide Read for 2016, and it was such an honour to be part of a project that encourages reading for pleasure. After all, what better opportunity to try and pass on the one thing has been a constant in my life?

img_0040-1And now… In case you missed my inane ramblings across social media over the last week (I was in shock, forgive me!), The Book of Shadows – Nine Lives Trilogy 2 has been shortlisted for the Irish Book Awards in the Children’s Book of the Year (Senior) category. I’m still coming down to earth with a bump as it was completely unexpected. In addition, two of the authors I met way back when are also shortlisted for the Irish Book Awards this year; Cath Ryan Howard (shortlisted in Crime for Distress Signals) and Hazel Gaynor (shortlisted in Popular Fiction for The Girl From the Savoy). And Vanessa, who brought us all together, is shortlisted for her debut, Little Bones writing as Sam Blake.

Don’t get me wrong – I don’t write for awards but being shortlisted for something like this is a real honour. Writing is a lonely profession, with lots of uncertainty, meandering pathways and all the emotions. I write because I can’t not write; because my passion for books and story outweighs my passion for anything else. Sometimes it’s difficult to see the way forward, but you stumble on blindly. A shortlist like this is like a beacon; it says, you’re on the right path, keep going, it’ll be OK!

But this isn’t just about me. It’s about all the writers out there who strive every day to create the best stories they can – whether it’s fiction or non-fiction, for adults or children, in whatever genre they prefer. The book community in Ireland is really social and supportive, and yes, people have ambitions and dreams, but they work really hard to achieve them and never forget the human factor.

My category is incredible strong and I am genuinely delighted for everyone on that list because they all deserve a spot with their fantastic books; Claire Hennessy, Deirdre Sullivan, Cecelia Ahern, Dave Rudden and Anna Carey, you are all rock stars and I can’t wait to share the celebrations with you on the big day.

(P.S. If you love books and haven’t voted yet for your favourites, here’s the link)

Awards, articles, submissions…

Rather than always harping on about my own thoughts on writing, or my garden, or stuff I’ve been doing, I like to share interesting tidbits from others that I’ve found around the place. And the last couple of weeks has been particularly interesting so here’s a few of my findings…

Bord Gais Book Awards

Whyte Books - a cosy haven for readers and writers

Whyte Books – a cosy haven for readers and writers

It’s a week of celebration as I’ve just finished the first draft of a new novel, and I also found out the bookshop I work in has been nominated for Bord Gais Irish Bookshop of the Year after winning the Munster vote. So, here’s a massive well done to Sheila, the owner, brains and driving force behind the lovely bookshop that is Whyte Books.

Also linked to the Bord Gais Book Awards, did you hear about the new Writing.ie Short Story Award? Well if not (and I hope it’s not too late) – you have to vote! Read the six shortlisted stories over on writing.ie (six stories for free? It’s a gift!) and then support your favourite by voting on the Bord Gais website. Stories & details here.

Horror Fiction

Is anyone writing horror out there? I love horror fiction and although it competes with crime on a global scale as one of the top genres, I feel it’s still underrated and under-appreciated in the UK and Ireland. I’ve felt rather out on a limb with my attempts at literary horror fiction, but that’s probably because I didn’t know this place – the Horror Writers Association – existed! Thanks to Paul Fitzgerald, a fellow writing.ie blogger, I’ve now found a homely hub for my guilty pleasure! 

Publishing opportunities

Take a look at the exciting new journal, Spontaneity, a refreshing new arts journal that’s all about inspiration, (think future submissions inspired by those selected for publication in previous issues). The first issue has the theme of Age and Beauty – details here.

As writers, we’re always looking for new outlets whether it’s competitions, journals or publishing houses. So here’s a few that stand out: firstly (you’ll have to be quick to get this one in – deadline is Nov 15th), Susan Lanigan’s free-to-enter short fiction competition Walking on Thin Ice based around ‘mental illness, stigma and oppressive institutional power’.  It may be free but the judge is Dave Lordan and there are cash prizes.

Two presses that have caught my interest are erbacce press, a co-operative that makes sure all contributors receive royalties, with all money feeding back into publishing more writers, and Notting Hill Editions, the home of the essay that’s doing exciting things (it produced the gorgeous Deborah Levy Things I Don’t Want To Know essay in response to Orwell’s Why I Write). Go check them both out – they’re gorgeous.

Art meets literature

It seems that every time you think there are no more incredibly interesting ideas left to discover, some talented/forward thinking individual comes up with one! In case you haven’t heard, there’s a weird but probably very wonderful installation/project happening around the Liffey, with quotes from Joyce being washed into the grime of the river’s surrounding walls. Derek Flynn has the info here.

Writing motivation

And finally, here’s a lovely post, I am Good Enough, And So Are You by Susan Lanigan that’s bound to lift your writing spirits.

If you have any more articles, links or competitions you think should be shared, please add in the comments below! I only have a certain amount of time free for researching this kind of stuff (with most of my info through blog subscriptions, twitter, writing.ie and chatting in Whyte Books) – so I’d be delighted if you’d expand my horizons!